March 7, 2019

News

“There is a major issue facing large animal and rural veterinarians, and Texas Tech is working to solve that. Currently there is only one veterinary school in Texas. Texas Tech’s veterinary school would help keep me close to home, which would make visiting family realistic and possible. It would also
“Texas Tech’s School of Veterinary Medicine would help me by giving me another opportunity to attend a veterinary school here in Texas. Right now, there is only one veterinary school in Texas, which has a limited number of seats available each year. Additionally, one of the primary focuses of Texas
“With the establishment of the Texas Tech School of Veterinary Medicine, one may consider its impact and the number of veterinarians in the state.” Read More: Vet school attempts to meet state need
“Texas is home to 13 medical schools, three dental schools, and nine law schools. There is certainly a need, and room for, a second veterinary school in the great state of Texas. Every industry thrives on competition, and veterinary medicine is no exception. Without competition we become complacent and settle
“Since Texas Tech announced its plans for a veterinary school, the number of new pre-veterinary majors has doubled while record numbers of Texas students are leaving the state to pursue their veterinary education in other states and, increasingly, other countries.” Read More: Students Forced to Leave Texas for Veterinary Education
“Wednesday on KFYO Mornings with Dave King and Matt Martin, the President of Texas Tech University Dr. Lawrence Schovanec joined Dave and Matt to talk about…the Tech Vet School and more.” Read More: Dr. Schovanec Talks NCAA Tournament, Vet School, and More
“We sit down with Jason Herrick. Jason is the President of Pantera Energy, an oil and gas operation in the Panhandle.  He is the chair for the committee working to make the Texas Tech University Veterinary School a reality. Jason shares information about how a vet school would benefit our
“When DeWit needs veterinary care, though, he calls some trusted veterinarians in New Mexico. That is not unusual for most cattle ranchers and dairy farm operators in the Texas Panhandle, where the number of veterinarians dedicated to large-animal health are dwindling each year. Texas Tech University is changing that, addressing